Poland and abortion


Hi there, 

Poland has become one of the few countries where abortion is being rolled back. Its high court has ruled that nearly all terminations are unconstitutional. This is being denounced an antediluvian outrage.

However, it will be interesting to read the judgement as the majority appears to have contended that abortion for foetal defects is basically eugenics. After all, it was only last year that US Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas said in a dissenting opinion that “abortion is an act rife with the potential for 'eugenic manipulation'”.

to make a comment, click here

 

The Netherlands moves to legalise euthanasia for children


It hardly comes as a surprise, but doctors in The Netherlands may soon be able to euthanise children under 12. They are already authorised to euthanise children up to 1 year old old and over 12. And although there is no "right to die" in Spain at the moment, the current coalition government is keen to join the club of countries where euthanasia is legal. Read all about it below. 

to make a comment, click here

 

Strange, strange times


These are strange, strange times. Today I read an editorial in The New York Times headed, “Get Well, Mr. President”. I don’t recall ever reading words of personal concern like this before in the Times. It was very touching.

But, of course, the editorial’s theme was not only wishing him and the First Lady well, but demanding complete transparency about his health now that he has been infected with the coronavirus. We’ll be hearing a lot more about every detail of Mr Trump’s life in the next few days.

Speaking of which, I shall be taking a brief holiday this week. The next BioEdge newsletter will be on October 18.

Cheers,

Michael Cook 
Editor

to make a comment, click here

 

the nomination of Amy Coney Barrett


Judge Amy Coney Barrett gave a gracious acceptance speech after being nominated by President Trump to the US Supreme Court. “The flag of the United States is still flying at half staff in memory of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg to mark the end of a great American life,” she said. “She not only broke glass ceilings, but she smashed them. She was a woman of enormous talent and consequences and her life of public service serves as an example to us all.”

It was a moving tribute to RBG, but ACB is expected to help shift SCOTUS in a very different direction – more conservative, and above all, more sceptical of abortion. As I wrote before, bioethics is “at the very centre of this strange election”.

Michael Cook  
Editor 

to make a comment, click here

 

Don’t buy this for Christmas


Our lead story today is -- sort of -- about a Christmas gift. Specifically, one that you probably shouldn't buy for people you don't know very well: a subscription to a genealogy website. Two fertility doctors are being sued in the US after the offspring of former patients discovered that the doctors are their biological fathers. For them, and for their mothers, the news was devastating. 

This is not the first time that this has happened, of course, and the lawyer leading the lawsuit against the doctors warns that there will be many more. This despicable behaviour appears to have been common 30 or 40 years ago and 30 or 40 is the age when people start to get curious about their sperm donor fathers and buy DNA testing kits. 

to make a comment, click here

 

Rolling out vaccines


Sooner or later scientists will create a vaccine for Covid-19. But how will it be distributed? Securing agreement on this is going to be nearly as difficult as discovering the vaccine. Here we report on a solution by one of America's leading bioethicists, Ezekiel Emanuel. 

Michael Cook
Editor 

to make a comment, click here

 

Euthanasia in Victoria


In 2017 Victoria became the first state in Australia to legalise assisted suicide and euthanasia. The government proudly declared that 68 safeguards made it the most conservative law of its kind in the world. The state's premier predicted that there would be about a dozen deaths, not too many, nothing to get your knickers in a knot about. 

A report for the law's first year of operation, however, has revealed that more than 120 people died -- ten times more than expected. It doesn't seem that the brakes are working. 

to make a comment, click here

 

Trump launches his campaign


Like the Democratic candidate, Joe Biden, Republican President Donald Trump touched upon a number of bioethical issues when he accepted his nomination this week. 

I found it surprising that Trump devoted so much time to broadcasting his anti-abortion, pro-life message. It's not surprising -- his Administration has worked against Planned Parenthood and backed nominees to the Supreme Court who appeared to be anti-abortion.

But Trump did so boldly and without equivocation when he could have just settled for some boilerplate, His team must have calculated that it is an election-winning issue, no matter how polarising it appears to be. Is this a sign that public opinion is changing on this key bioethical issue? 

Michael Cook  
Editor 

to make a comment, click here

 

Joe Biden puts on boxing gloves


As I see it, there are only three topics worth talking about at the moment: Trump vs Biden, the coronavirus pandemic, and Trump vs Biden on the coronavirus pandemic. Sorry, there is a fourth, Christopher Nolan’s new film, Tenet, which looks quite intriguing, but does not fit into BioEdge very neatly.

Just after I finished writing today’s lead story about the Joe Biden’s acceptance speech, he expanded on its central theme: that he will do a better job ending the pandemic than Trump. In an interview with ABC TV, he declared that he would shut the country down rather than let the pandemic roar out of control.

“I will be prepared to do whatever it takes to save lives because we cannot get the country moving, until we control the virus,” Biden declared. “In order to keep the country running and moving and the economy growing, and people employed, you have to fix the virus, you have to deal with the virus.”

That puts bioethics at the very centre of this strange election. 

to make a comment, click here

 

Russia rushes its vaccine


Russia has dashed across the finish line and seized the trophy for being the first nation to release a vaccine for Covid-19. It has been nicknamed “Sputnik 5”, recalling the Soviet Union’s glorious triumphs in the Space Race of the 1950s and 60s.

Scientists and bioethicists around the world, and even in Russia, have grave misgivings. Sputnik 5 has not even completed Phase 3 clinical trials. If the Russian vaccine is ineffective or unsafe, it could deter many people from being inoculated with an effective vaccine when it arrives.

By one of those awful coincidences which sometimes happen with new products, Sputnik 5 is being trialled at the same time as a Russian movie which is also called “Sputnik”. This, however, is a horror film about a guest which returns from outer space with an unlucky cosmonaut. It turns out to be a slithering extraterrestrial parasite which feasts on human brains. (Rated 90% on Rotten Tomatoes).

Is there a translation for Murphy’s Law?

to make a comment, click here

 

Page 3 of 51 :  < 1 2 3 4 5 >  Last ›


 Search BioEdge

 Subscribe to BioEdge newsletter
rss Subscribe to BioEdge RSS feed