Has Canada endorsed sex-selective abortion?


Last week we reported that India has failed to reverse its skewed sex ratio – millions of baby girls are being aborted. The gendercide holocaust is not for lack of social messaging and feel-good feminist-friendly rhetoric. Politicians, bureaucrats, activists, educators are all singing from the same song sheet: do not abort girls. It hasn’t worked.

Most of the readers of BioEdge do not live in India and are not subject to the social pressures there. In countries like the US or the UK or Australia we might even feel a bit smug and self-righteous: we would never support sex-selective abortion, would we?

Don’t be so sure. Ultra-socially-progressive Canada just had a chance to reject sex-selection and blew it. Its Parliament overwhelmingly voted down a bill condemning sex-selection. Read about it below.

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The missing 13 million girls of India


This is odd, isn't it? That The Lancet Global Health published an article which claimed that "13.5 million female births were missing during the three decades of observation (1987–2016), on the basis of a natural sex ratio of 950 girls per 1000 boys". And you won't find anything in the media about it. What's going on in news rooms? Distracted by Covid? Bedazzled by Biden? Bored with this gendercide stuff? What's your explanation?

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Abortion access will be a SCOTUS challenge


The US Supreme Court has agreed to hear a potentially ground-breaking abortion case which could turn abortion access into a major issue in the 2022 midterm elections. This has been triggered by state laws which dramatically restrict abortion access. Texas is the latest of these, as we report in today’s lead story.

Michael Cook   
Editor 
 

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Open access book about euthanasia


An open access book, published by Springer, has been written by ten Belgian health care professionals, nurses, university professors and doctors specializing in palliative care and ethicists who fear that euthanasia has become normalised and trivial. Far from being polemical, these stories of life and death present another side to the narrative of patient autonomy. Check out the link in our story below. 

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‘Uterine morality’


I had never heard of the term "uterine morality" until this week. At first I thought that it must mean a more traditional approach to sexual mores or perhaps something to do with innovative transplant surgery.

But no, it's a term coined on social media by some Chinese feminists to express their disgust at ugly children with ugly fathers. In short, it's a slogan for DIY eugenics. It might only catch on in China or Korea or India, where there is a shortage of marriageable young women. But it's an interesting sign of the times. Read about it below. 

Michael Cook   
Editor 

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Do we need an international pandemic treat?


Even as nations struggle to cope with Covid-19 catastrophes, 23 world leaders have called for the adoption of an international pandemic treaty. However noble this may sound, this is being criticised as a useless proposal, or even as a distraction from the urgent task of vaccinating poor countries. Only 2% of global vaccine doses have been administered in Africa and India, China, Brazil and the US do not appear to be interested…

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Planned Parenthood evolves


This was a headline in the New York Times which was sure to catch my eye: “I’m the Head of Planned Parenthood. We’re Done Making Excuses for Our Founder.” The author is Alexis McGill Johnson, the new president of PP. She candidly acknowledges the racist and eugenicist views of Margaret Sanger and disavows them completely. What she is not disavowing is PP’s role as America’s leading abortion provider.  

Perhaps she is being ruthlessly consistent in repudiating Sanger’s ideas. For Sanger, surprisingly, was opposed to abortion in most cases. She used to explain to women that “abortion was the wrong way—no matter how early it was performed it was taking life.” 

Michael Cook    
BioEdge 
 

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Colombia stays put


In potted surveys of the progress of euthanasia around the world, Colombia is often mentioned as a country which has embraced the right to die. Not so, in fact. The legislature has never voted for a euthanasia law. This week euthanasia supporters again had a chance and again they failed. As in Montana, the country’s high court had ruled back in 1997 that the right to die was constitutional – but the legislature has never ratified it. Is this another case of judicial activism gone rogue? Read our lead story today.

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Another American state legalises assisted suicide


The right-to-die is advancing in the US. New Mexico finally legalised assisted suicide this week, making it the 11th American jurisdiction. However, in France and Latvia it was rejected -- for a range of reasons. It's an interesting landscape. Read about it below. 

Michael Cook  
Editor 

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The co-parenting trend


The bizarre phenomenon of platonic co-parenting seems to be increasingly popular. In fact, a TV network in the UK has created a reality show based on the concept. Matchmakers bring a guy and a girl together who are interested in having a baby but not in having a spouse, or even in having sex. This is so gobsmackingly unconventional that I am left at a loss for words. So, for the moment, I'll just note that there's no accounting for tastes. I'm sure that many readers will agree with me. 

There will be no BioEdge newsletter next week because of the Easter holiday. 

Michael Cook
Editor

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