Sex-selective abortion: I’m OK with that, says UK academic


Sex-selective abortion is almost universally reviled – by opponents of abortion because it kills an unborn child and by feminists because it entrenches discriminatory attitudes towards women. However, it has its defenders, even in the Western world.

Writing in The Conversation, Dr Pam Lowe, a sociologist at Aston University in the UK, argues that “You cannot promote gender equality by enacting laws that place restrictions on women’s bodies. Banning sex-selective abortion opens up a world in which there is such thing as a ‘good’ and ‘bad’ reason for an abortion.” To her mind, a ban is a plot by pro-life politicians to make incremental restrictions on a woman’s right to abortion, both in the UK and in the US.

“Although it may seem counter-intuitive, supporters of women’s rights need to oppose the banning of sex-selective abortion. This campaign has nothing to do with ending gender discrimination. It is a strategy of the pro-life movement to reduce women’s access to abortion more generally. While the continuing discrimination against women which leads to coercive abortion for gender reasons is a serious problem, you cannot end gender oppression by placing new restrictions on women’s lives.”



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