Londa Schiebinger

Londa Schiebinger is the John L. Hinds Professor of History of Science at Stanford
University and a member of the American Academy of Arts. She is currently Director of the EU/US Gendered Innovations in Science, Health & Medicine, Engineering, and Environment Project. From 2004-2010, Schiebinger served as the Director of Stanford’s Clayman Institute for Gender Research.

Her new book is Secret Cures of Slaves: People, Plants, and Medicine in the Eighteenth-Century Atlantic’ (Stanford University Press). She is also author of the prize-winning Plants and Empire: Colonial Bioprospecting in the Atlantic World (Harvard University Press, 2004), The Mind Has No Sex? Women in the Origins of Modern Science (Harvard University Press, 1989); Nature’s Body: Gender in the Making of Modern Science (Beacon Press, 1993); Gendered Innovations in Science and Engineering (Stanford University Press, 2008); and edited with Robert N. Proctor, Agnotology: The Making and Unmaking of Ignorance (Stanford University Press, 2008); and with Ineke Klinge, Gendered Innovations: How Gender Analysis Contributes to Research, (Publications Office of the European Union, 2013).

Professor Schiebinger received her Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1984 and is a
leading international authority on diversity in science. Londa Schiebinger presented the keynote address and wrote the conceptual background paper for the United Nations’ Expert Group Meeting on Gender, Science, and Technology, September 2010 in Paris. She presented the finding at the United Nations in New York, February 2011 with an update spring 2014.

Schiebinger is the recipient of numerous prizes and awards, including the prestigious Alexander von Humboldt Research Prize and Guggenheim Fellowship. She holds honorary doctorates from the Vrije Universiteit Brussel (2013), the Faculty of Science, Lund University, Sweden (2017), and the University of Valencia, Spain (2017)



Londa Schiebinger | 19 Aug 2017 |
tags: experimentation, history of bioethics, history of medicine, informed consent, slavery
Doctors used slaves to test primitive cures for tropical diseases
 

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