May
11
 

Cracked Open, a journalist’s memoir of IVF

Journalist Miriam Zoll has just released a personal account of her traumatizing encounter with the reproductive technology industry, Cracked Open: Liberty, Fertility and the Pursuit of High Tech Babies.

Like many women, she felt that she was exempt from age-related fertility decline. When she marries in her mid-30s, she was shocked to discover that she had endometrial cysts on her ovaries. Then she turned to IVF treatment. When that failed after four cycles, she turned to two egg donors. These both failed.   

Drawing on her own experience, Zoll has written an eye-opening memoir. As a professional human rights and health advocate, she is well-qualified to investigate the fertility industry. It is not a cheerful story. She writes:

“The fact is, in the United States, there is virtually no oversight of any aspect of the industry, and few if any long-term studies tracking the health of women undergoing treatments or the babies born from them. The only requirement is the Fertility Clinic Success Rate and Certification Act of 1992 -- a ‘law’ that loosely mandates clinics to report their annual ‘success rates’ to the Centers for Disease Control.

“In the course of my research I discovered that the vast majority of assisted reproductive technologies fail. Around the globe in 2012, approximately 1.5 million ART cycles were performed, with an estimated 1.1 million failed cycles (76.7 percent). In 2010 in the United States, the most recent data available from the Centers for Disease Control reveals that of the estimated 150,000 ART cycles conducted, approximately 103,000 (68.6 percent) failed.”

The goal of Cracked Open to ignite a consumer-driven public education movement as a counterweight to decades of uncritical media coverage. Zoll would like to see more protection for women undergoing treatment and their children. 

 

 



This article is published by Michael Cook and BioEdge.org under a Creative Commons licence. You may republish it or translate it free of charge with attribution for non-commercial purposes following these guidelines. If you teach at a university we ask that your department make a donation. Commercial media must contact us for permission and fees. Some articles on this site are published under different terms.

comments powered by Disqus
 

 Search BioEdge

 Subscribe to BioEdge newsletter
rss Subscribe to BioEdge RSS feed


 Recent Posts
Scientists slam consumer genetic test for same-sex attraction
20 Oct 2019
Health of LGBQ youth did not improve after Obergefell v Hodges: study
20 Oct 2019
Most Dutch paediatricians want euthanasia for kids: report
20 Oct 2019
Chlamydia a source of unexplained male infertility
20 Oct 2019
Ectogenesis keeps chugging along
20 Oct 2019

Home | About Us | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | rss RSS | Archive | Bookmark and Share | michael@bioedge.org

BioEdge - New Media Foundation Ltd © 2004 - 2019