US doctors shunning O&G </b>

Young American doctors are turning away from obstetrics and gynaecology. Since 1996, the number of graduates of US medical schools who enter O&G courses has dropped 23%, from 968 to 743. Only two-thirds of new residencies in O&G were filled by graduates of US medical schools -- compared with 86% eight years ago. "Nationally, we certainly are concerned about quality," says that head of O&G at Johns Hopkins Hospital. "If we're seeing fewer people going into the speciality, then we do need to start worrying about the quality of the people." The reasons are familiar ones: the highest insurance premiums… MORE




Authors failing to disclose competing interests </b>

Despite strict disclosure policies, some authors writing for highly respected medical journals still keep their financial interests to themselves, according to a report by the Center for Science in the Public Interest, a Washington-based pressure group. After researching the financial connections of the authors of 163 articles in four journals, the CSPI found that 13 (8%) failed to comply with disclosure policies. The authors of one paper on coronary heart disease were consultants to more than 20 companies in the field, but failed to disclose them. However, the situation actually may be improving. In 2001, only 1% of papers disclosed… MORE




Adult stem cells can flourish without fusion </b>

One of the objections to the promise of adult stem cells is that they do not actually transform themselves into heart, brain, blood or liver cells but rather fuse with other cells. However, a researcher at Yale University in the US has found that bone-marrow derived stem cells can form tissues other than blood without fusion.

In an ingenious experiment, two strains of genetically-engineered mice were created whose cells would produce a glowing green jellyfish protein if fusion occurred. Male bone marrow was then transplanted into a female. Two to three months later, they found differentiated cells from the donor… MORE





ODD SPOT: Neo-Nazi sets up Aryan baby farm

 A German neo-Nazi has used an English shelf company to set up a racially-pure Aryan baby farm in a quiet commuter suburb near Bremen. The company, the Wilhelm Tietjen Foundation for Fertilisation Ltd, "aims to help childless couples produce children" with the help of surrogate mothers, says the organiser, Jurgen Riegen, a lawyer who has become notorious for defending members of the German far right.

Local townsfolk are outraged. "At first, we thought he was merely planning to develop agricultural fertilisers and manure," said the mayor of Doerverden. "We didn't realise human fertilisation is intended." The foundation is named… MORE





ABI Publications </b>

Ethics as Our Guide(letter)
by Michael Cook, PLoS Biology, June 2004

Blackburn and Rowley's (2004) criticism of a report on embryonic stem cell research from the President's Council on Bioethics (2004) is puzzling. Where is the bioethics?...
  

IN BRIEF: BMJ's ethics MORE





The Lancet launches embryo stem cell campaign

 One of the world's leading medical journals, The Lancet, has launched a campaign for human embryonic stem cell research as the UN approaches a debate on a cloning ban and US voters go to the polls. Its current issue is dedicated almost solely to medical, scientific and regulatory issues surrounding stem cells, with an editorial urging scientists to lobby hard for the cause. It also includes a profile of Australian stem cell scientist Alan Trounson and a personal plea from the father of a paralysed footballer. Ironically, the journal's press release highlighted only progress in the field of adult stem… MORE




New promise for adult stem cell research

 Two articles in the current issue of The Lancet highlight possible therapeutic uses of adult stem cells. In a German study, adult stem cells derived from bone marrow improved cardiac functioning after heart attacks.

Helmut Drexler, of the University of Freiburg, found that the transfer of patients' own bone-marrow cells could improve functioning of the left ventricle of the heart six months after treatment. Patients who had been given stem-cell transfers had around a 7% improvement in left ventricular function compared with only a 0?7% increase for patients given drugs.

In a second study, skin cells were… MORE





British doctors debate ethics at annual meeting </b>

The annual meeting of the British Medical Association defeated a motion that policy statements on controversial issues should be decided at the annual meeting rather than in its ethics committee. According to the BMJ, "there was a general feeling that the committee lacked transparency and was remote from the membership".

Dr Greg Gardner, a general practitioner from Birmingham, cited approval given by the BMA's ethics committee to the UK's fertility authority and also to artificial reproduction by same sex couples. "The ethics committee may be in close touch with the HFEA (Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority) but it is out… MORE





Bush under pressure from scientists

 More than 4,000 scientists, including 48 Nobel laureates and 127 members of the National Academy of Sciences have signed a letter accusing the Bush administration of imposing a conservative political ideology on American science. The same letter was released in February by an environmental lobby group, the Union of Concerned Scientists, with only 62 names. Their opponents, however, counter that government-funded science has always been politicised and that it is odd for scientists to be running a highly politicised campaign against politicised science.

Many of the scientist complain that they deserved to be appointed to important government boards and… MORE





Foetal stem cells persist in mothers </b>

Cells from babies live on in their mothers for her lifetime and could even prolong it, US researchers at Tufts-New England Medical Center have found. Foetal cells which appear to act like adult stem cells have been found in the livers, thyroids and spleens of women who have been pregnant. The discovery could influence the American debate about embryonic stem cells because these extremely rare cells appear to migrate to diseased organs and help to heal them.

"If we can prove these are stem cells, and harvest them from the blood or tissue of a woman who's been pregnant,… MORE




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