October
18
 

Bestiality to be banned in Denmark

Denmark plans to ban bestiality – a practice that has long been illegal in other European nations. Danish food and agricultural minister Dan Jorgensen said that the practice was harming animals and damaging the country’s image. Speaking in an interview with Ekstra Bladet, a Danish tabloid, Jorgensen commented: “I have decided that we should ban sex with animals. That is happening for numerous reasons. The most important is that in the vast majority of cases it is an attack against the animals.”

“It is also damaging to our country's reputation to allow this practice to continue here while it is banned elsewhere”, he continued.

There has been a significant rise in underground animal sex tourism in Denmark since its neighbours Norway, Sweden and Germany outlawed bestiality. A recent Gallup poll revealed 76% of Danes supported a ban on animal sex.

Bioethicist Wesley Smith criticised the motivations behind… click here to read whole article and make comments




 
October
17
 

A cool, rational analysis of egg freezing

With egg freezing rapidly becoming a fashionable reproductive option, the Harvard Law and Policy Review has published a survey article about the dangers of this form of fertility preservation. Barry University law professor Seema Mohapatra surveys the medico-ethical, legal and social complexities of egg freezing in an impressive literature survey entitled ‘Using Egg Freezing to Extend the Biological Clock: Fertility Insurance or False Hope?’.

Considering all the latest studies, Mohapatra argues that egg freezing needs to be treated with appropriate caution by medical practitioners and the general public.

Mohapatra discusses the scientific risks of freezing, emphasising that significant doubt remains about the safety of the procedure:  

“Although the American Society of Reproductive Medicine ('ASRM') removed the 'experimental' label from egg freezing, ASRM was careful not to endorse the practice. In fact, ASRM actually found a 'lack of data on safety, efficacy, cost-effectiveness, and potential emotional risks' associated… click here to read whole article and make comments



 
October
17
 

OPINION: Egg freezing is a health risk

Responsible doctors should not be recommending egg freezing to perfectly healthy young women who have no medically indicated need. The dearth of evidence-based safety and efficacy data, combined with low numbers of live births resulting from egg freezing, do not justify broadening the application of the procedure to the general public at this time.

There is no long-term data tracking the health risks of women who inject hormones and undergo egg retrieval, and no one knows how much of the chemicals used in the freezing process are absorbed by eggs, and whether they are toxic to cell development. In addition, even with the new flash freezing process, the most comprehensive data available reveals a 77 percent failure rate of frozen eggs resulting in a live birth in women aged 30, and a 91 percent failure rate in women aged 40.

According to the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology, for… click here to read whole article and make comments




 
October
11
 

15% rise in Dutch euthanasia deaths

Euthanasia cases in the Netherlands increased 15% in 2013 compared to 2012, according to the latest official statistics. There were 4,829 reported cases, although this almost certainly understates the number, as a significant proportion are not reported. The latest figures follow increases of 13% in 2012, 18% in 2011, 19% in 2010, and 13% in 2009. Most of the cases last year involved cancer, but there were 97 cases of dementia and 42 psychiatric cases. Euthanasia now represents over 3% of all Dutch deaths.

A persistent British critic of euthanasia, Dr Peter Saunders, claims the official statistics are somewhat misleading.  “These deaths represent only a fraction of the total number of deaths resulting from Dutch doctors intentionally ending their patients’ lives through deliberate morphine overdose, withdrawal of hydration and sedation.”

click here to read whole article and make comments



 
October
11
 

Argentine doctors on trial for baby theft under right-wing junta

Mothers of "los desaparecidos" protesting in 1977

Separating mothers from their babies has usually been regarded as a crime, but there are few instances more egregious than baby theft by the Argentine 1976-1983 military junta. Now in their 80s and in failing health, two doctors and a midwife have been put on trial for their role in this dark chapter.

They are accused of participating in a policy of ending the bloodlines of leftists in order to reorganise society. About 500 pregnant women were imprisoned by the junta. When they gave birth, their babies were taken and adopted by military families. The women were killed or were “disappeared”. About 115 of these children, now in their 30s, have been reunited with relatives. The rest have not been located.

The two doctors, Norberto Bianco and Raul Martin, and the midwife, Yolanda Arroche, have… click here to read whole article and make comments




 
October
11
 

Gene of the week: paedophilia

Add paedophilia to the growing list of genetically-determined attractions, preferences and predispositions. In a New York Times op-ed, a law professor from Rutgers University contends that paedophilia is not a matter of choice. Margo Kaplan writes that:

“Recent research, while often limited to sex offenders — because of the stigma of pedophilia — suggests that the disorder may have neurological origins. Pedophilia could result from a failure in the brain to identify which environmental stimuli should provoke a sexual response. MRIs of sex offenders with pedophilia show fewer of the neural pathways known as white matter in their brains. Men with pedophilia are three times more likely to be left-handed or ambidextrous, a finding that strongly suggests a neurological cause. Some findings also suggest that disturbances in neurodevelopment in utero or early childhood increase the risk of pedophilia.”

Ms Kaplan admits that paedophiles do not… click here to read whole article and make comments




 
October
11
 

Korean stem cell fraud in technicolour

The only trailer for “Whistle Blower”, a just-released Korean feature film about the biggest fraud in the world of science in decades, lacks English sub-titles, unfortunately. However, with a tense soundtrack, grim faces and menacing crowds, the message is clear enough: a collective hysteria gripped South Korea when Hwang Woo-suk claimed to have cloned human embryos and produced live-saving embryonic stem cells.

The journalists who exposed Hwang’s unethical mendacity were regarded as heartless and unpatriotic. According to the Wall Street Journal:

“Ryu Young-joon, the real whistleblower, told science journal Nature in January this year that had his identity leaked online and he and his family went into hiding for six months after the first program was broadcast following threats from Dr. Hwang’s supporters.”

Let’s hope the producers make the film available with English sub-titles soon. (Thanks for the tip to Pete Shanks at Biopolitical Times.)

click here to read whole article and make comments



 
October
11
 

Mars Exploration Bioethics 101

All Star Trek fans will be familiar with ethical dilemmas in deep space. However, they might not be aware that bioethicists have opened serious discussions as projects for the exploration of Mars advance. An American group called Inspiration Mars plans to launch a married couple to fly around Mars in 2018 and return to Earth. A Dutch group called Mars One is seeking two men and two women to establish a settlement on Mars in 2024. It will be a one-way trip.

In Slate, Patrick Lin and Keith Abney of the Ethics + Emerging Sciences Group discuss some of the ethical challenges which such expeditions will probably encounter – “a sort of Astronaut Bioethics 101”.

Lifeboat ethics. What happens if an accident reduces the amount of air or other resources for a four-man flight to two or three? Should the astronauts draw straws to decide… click here to read whole article and make comments




 
October
11
 

What does the public really think about the dead donor rule?

A new study in the Journal of Medical Ethics claims that the US public is in favour of waiving the dead donor rule in certain circumstances. The study, produced by researchers from Florida State University College of Medicine, examined the opinions of 1056 US citizens – a sample intended to provide a rough cross-section of US society. 

The researchers asked participants to complete an online survey, presenting them with a vignette of a man in a vegetative state, and asking whether it should be legal for him to donate his organs even if it causes his death. Participants were also asked more general questions, such as whether it should be legal for doctors to remove organs from consenting vegetative patients despite it causing their death, and whether they themselves would donate their organs if they were in a vegetative state.  

The study found that 71% believed the patient… click here to read whole article and make comments




 
October
11
 

New infertility treatment results in successful birth

A woman in Sweden has become the first person to give birth after a womb transplant. The 36-year-old woman, a subject in a novel study into womb transplantation, received a transplant from a unrelated 61-year-old donor last year. The woman conceived via IVF and gave birth to a healthy baby boy earlier this year. 

The doctors conducting the procedure said that strong immuno-suppression drugs are vital to prevent wombs being rejected. The womb has to be removed after birth, due to the danger posed by long-term use of the powerful suppression medication. 

Prof Mats Brannstrom, who led the transplant team, described the birth in Sweden as a joyous moment.

“That was a fantastic happiness for me and the whole team, but it was an unreal sensation also because we really could not believe we had reached this moment.”

In an anonymous interview with the AP news… click here to read whole article and make comments




 

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